The term ‘landing page’ is often used in the marketing world, and sometimes can be difficult to understand by business owners. What exactly is a landing page? I’ve been asked a few times.

The answer is simple: A landing page is the first page on a website that visitors see when they click on the respective site link. In other words, it’s the page you land on when you visit a website.

Landing pages are often used in paid traffic campaigns, especially Google Ads campaign, where a visitor is taken from Google’s Search Engine Result Pages (SERP) to a website. Therefore, it is important to have a landing page that is proven to convert more visitors to subscribers, customers, etc.

In this post, I’ll outline 5 key elements of a good landing page. These are mainly key areas that can be found in any type of landing page. Having all these elements will make it easier to design a landing page that converts.

 Meta Tags | Landing Page | KayVee Media
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1. Meta Tags

Meta tags are still relevant in 2019. Yes, you’d need a good Meta Title and Description to improve your conversion rate when running ad campaigns on Google Ads, or even to rank high on organic search.

Why? Simply because Google uses these tags to understand more about your products and services. This helps the search engine to serve you with the relevant traffic. If the meta tags aren’t filled in properly with the relevant keywords, it would be difficult for Google to place your listing in a prominent position online.

This section of the website doesn’t appear on the website. It’s mainly seen by the search bots.

Heading | Landing Page | KayVee Media
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2. Headings

This section of the landing page is visible to the visitor and describes the objective of the page. It could be a single-handed reason why visitors scroll down to the other sections.

It’s important that you keep your heading; simple, short and descriptive. Avoid being too creative and come up with a phrase that doesn’t clearly inform the visitor what your landing page is all about.

Always use the H1 tag when creating the main header for your business and the H3 tags to create a section tag.

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3. Benefits

What is the benefit of taking action on your website? What is the benefit of your visitor spending time to read the content on your landing page? It’s imperative that you convey a number of benefits that will spark up a level of interests with your visitors.

Even if it’s a blog post, you should have a simple section that outlines the benefits of reading the blog post. However, I do understand that landing pages are predominantly used to get visitors to take action. This is why having some clear benefits will make your visitors feel like they are in the right place.

Lastly, do not make your benefits centered around you. A good example would be a law firm listing its benefits with a focus on “immigration experts” etc.

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4. Call To Action

Assuming you have kept your visitor a minute longer on your website and you’d need them to interact with your content, one main way to get people to do what you want is to create compelling Call To Action buttons.

Call To Actions should be clear and convey the right messages. You won’t want to add something vague that would leave your visitors thinking if they should take action.

For example, a call to action that reads “Book An Appointment” on a dentist clinic website would be easier to understand than “Book A Call”.

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5. Links

There are two main types of links that are needed on your landing page. Navigational links and Legal links. These links are important and shouldn’t be omitted because they aren’t directly linked to the visitor taking the action you want.

Navigational links are links on the header or/and footer of your landing page that helps your visitor to browse across the various pages of your website.

Legal links are links that are required by law if you’re collecting any piece of information from your visitors, including cookie information. A few examples are Privacy Policy, Data Policy, etc.

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